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*(A)rt and (R)esearch on (T)ransformations of (I)ndividuals and (S)ocieties

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October 27, 2022

Can art that evokes awe make children behave more prosocially towards others?

Awe is a mystical emotion that people often feel in response to impactful works of art. An interesting and well-documented evolutionary function of awe is that it fosters social bonding and elicits strong feelings of interconnectedness when people experience it. Across two studies, a team of researchers from the University of Amsterdam and University of California Berkeley, led by Eftychia Stamkou, set out to examine the social effects of awe in children, by investigating how this emotion influenced their behavior towards refugees. Findings showed that children who experienced awe when exposed to art were more likely to engage in voluntary behavior that benefited refugees, as compared to children who were led to experience other emotions. In other words, art that induced awe sparked prosociality in children.
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September 25, 2022

ARTIS Research Presentations at VSAC 2022

ARTIS members participated as symposium moderators and presenters at the Visual Science of Art Conference (Amsterdam), which took place online from the 24st until the 27st of August 2022.
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Art has the power to change public debate, because it has the power to change each of us — Really? How, when, who, why?

ARTIS (Art and Research on Transformations of Individuals and Societies) is a EU Horizon 2020-funded project under the call “Societal Transformations and the Arts.” 

We represent a first-of-its-kind consortium of research institutions in the social sciences, Art History, Philosophy, Art education, and Art and Cultural Policy:

We argue that to make better policy that advances art’s efficacy, it is necessary to build a systematic program that combines empirical and theoretical research with perspectives of artists, art educators, and other art stakeholders. Our aims are to: Integrate state-of-the-art empirical approaches from psychology, neuroscience, and phenomenology to conduct a series of investigations that identify specific types of experiences with art. Connect these to changes at individual (neurocognitive, emotional, health) and societal (prosocial and political attitudes) levels. Capture these experiences in leading museums and urban centers across Europe and everyday life. Contextualize and challenge the empirical data using theoretical approaches from philosophy as well as political science and art criticism. Combine this empirical and theoretical focus with a series of interventions, workshops, and experimentations co-created with art schools, artists, and galleries. Translate the insights gained by our comprehensive methods and co-creations with artists into policy guidelines disseminated by key stakeholders in art and culture. 

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