Art*is Logo

*(A)rt and (R)esearch on (T)ransformations of (I)ndividuals and (S)ocieties

*
October 27, 2022

Can art that evokes awe make children behave more prosocially towards others?

Awe is a mystical emotion that people often feel in response to impactful works of art. An interesting and well-documented evolutionary function of awe is that it fosters social bonding and elicits strong feelings of interconnectedness when people experience it. Across two studies, a team of researchers from the University of Amsterdam and University of California Berkeley, led by Eftychia Stamkou, set out to examine the social effects of awe in children, by investigating how this emotion influenced their behavior towards refugees. Findings showed that children who experienced awe when exposed to art were more likely to engage in voluntary behavior that benefited refugees, as compared to children who were led to experience other emotions. In other words, art that induced awe sparked prosociality in children.
*
September 25, 2022

ARTIS Research Presentations at VSAC 2022

ARTIS members participated as symposium moderators and presenters at the Visual Science of Art Conference (Amsterdam), which took place online from the 24st until the 27st of August 2022.
*
*
October 14, 2022

ARTIS Research Presentations at IAEA 2022

written by Corinna Kühnapfel

ARTIS members participated as symposium moderators and presenters at the 2022 Biennial Congress of the International Association of Empirical Aesthetics in Philadelphia

ARTIS members participated as symposium moderators and presenters at the 2022 Biennial Congress of the International Association of Empirical Aesthetics, which took place at the University of Pennsylvania and Barnes Foundation, and which was organized by the Penn Center for Neuroaesthetics and the Barnes Foundation during August 31- September 2, 2022. The symposium was titled “Mediating the connective power of art: Exploring interventions for maximizing art’s impacts in ecologically valid gallery or real-life settings”.

The individual contributions were (moderated by Matthew Pelowski & Joerg Fingerhut):

  • Can you feel the difference? – A fNIRS study Exploring Emotional Connections and Perceived Intentionality in Actual or Presumed AI- and Human-generated Art.
    Theresa Rahel Demmer
  • Welcome to Hell – the Influence of Intentionally Designed Gallery Lighting on Aesthetic Experience of The Last Judgement by H. Bosch
    Stephanie Miller
  • Empirical Aesthetics for Installation Art: The Role of the Body in the Experience of Tomás Saraceno’s Art Installation “In Orbit.”
    Corinna Kühnapfel
  • Unlocking the Muse: Insights into if, when, and why artistic creativity might emerge and be applied in the lives of people with Parkinson’s disease.
    Matthew Pelowski

MacKenzie Trupp gave a presentation titled “Only one Monet in-person and online: How does an online art intervention compare to an in-gallery art intervention for anxiety and mood?” as part of the symposium “Digital Art Experiences: Examining Digital and In-Person Experiences and Introducing Research Tools for Understanding Virtual Art Experiences”.

For more information, please visit: https://www.iaeaphilly2022.com/

*